Snow forecast UK latest: Brits to brace for freezing temperatures as snow forecasted for December

SNOW is set to fall for TWO WEEKS as freezing temperatures will set in after killer Storm Arwen ripped through Britain.

Frozen flurries hit parts of the UK yesterday along with gusts of almost 100mph as a rare red wind warning was issued on Friday.

But freezing conditions are set to continue into December.

WX Charts show the wintery weather will continue next Friday affecting England, Scotland and Wales.

And Brits will be braced for weeks of cold conditions – as more snow is currently also forecast for December 13.

This means that snow is set to fall – potentially causing transport and travel issues – in the next two weeks.

Read our weather live blog for the latest forecasts and updates…

  • Milica Cosic

    Explained: How cold does it have to get in order to be sent home?

    There isn't a set temperature where employers have to send their employees home because it's too cold.

    However, they should be able to provide regular breaks and plenty of opportunities to drink a hot drink.
    In addition, it's the employer's responsibility to ensure that the workplace has additional heating if the temperatures do get too cold.

    Employers are recommended to include flexible working hours or rotas to help reduce the effects of a cold snap, but don't have to.

    Kate Palmer, head of advisory at employment law consultancy Peninsula, told The Sun Online an employer has no obligation to pay an employee if they fail to turn up for work because:

    1. The weather is bad
    2. Public transport is not running
    3. Hours missed if they turn up late
  • Milica Cosic

    When is it too cold to go to work?

    The Met Office has warned that shots of Arctic air will hit the UK shores in the coming days – "meaning much colder and wetter weather".

    Up to 20 inches of snow are predicted to fall in Scotland starting from Sunday, with the icy weather moving further down the country over the following days.

    Everyone loves a snow day but unfortunately there is no guarantee of a day off just because it is snowing.

    There is no law for minimum or maximum working temperatures.

  • Milica Cosic

    Big freeze in the I'm A Celeb castle

    I’m A Celeb contestants were evacuated last night as the show was forced off air for the first time after Storm Arwen sent a 100ft tree crashing into a wall of Gwrych Castle. 

    They had initially hunkered down inside when ITV bosses were forced to clear crew from the site after howling 80mph winds wreaked havoc.

    But the stars were dramatically whisked out of camp last night amid safety fears at the castle.

    I’m A Celeb officials last night confirmed the move “while we get the production base back up”.

     Sources said the celebs will return to pre-show quarantine measures to make sure they remain Covid-secure.

    One added: “This move has been taken to speed up the show’s possible return to the screen. Once the site is all safe and ready to film, they’ll return.”

  • Milica Cosic

    Wintery weather to continue

    WX Charts show the wintery weather will continue next Friday affecting England, Scotland and Wales.

    And Brits will be braced for weeks of cold conditions – as more snow is currently also forecast for December 13.

    This means that snow is set to fall – potentially causing transport and travel issues – in the next two weeks.

  • Milica Cosic

    Snow to fall for TWO WEEKS 

    SNOW is set to fall for TWO WEEKS as freezing temperatures will set in after killer Storm Arwen ripped through Britain.

    Frozen flurries hit parts of the UK yesterday along with gusts of almost 100mph as a rare red wind warning was issued on Friday.

    But freezing conditions are set to continue into December.

  • Milica Cosic

    Explained: Why do storms have names?

    The Met Office decided to start giving storms names back in 2014, in the same way they do in America.

    The first windstorm to be named was Abigail on 10 November 2015 and since they’ve been asking the public to suggest names.

    Past storms included Storm Francis, Storm Dennis, and Storm Ophelia – and if you’re wondering whether it’s just that the public have an eclectic taste for names, the Met Office purposely pick names less common, so as to reduce any bad association with the storm.

    They hoped that naming big storms will make people more aware of them and how dangerous they can be.

    The UK storms will take it in turns to be girls’ or boys’ names but strangely, research shows that hurricanes with female names are more likely to hurt more people than those with males names.

    Scientists think that’s because people find female names less threatening.

  • Milica Cosic

    Explained: How to turn on the iPhone snow function

    First, make sure you’re updated to iOS 15 – go to Settings > General > Software Update.

    Then grant the Weather app your location info, otherwise it won’t work.

    Go to Settings > Privacy > Location Services > Weather and select Always.

    You’ll get even better alerts if you grant Precise Location access.

    Next, make sure the Weather app can send notifications.

    Go to Settings > Notifications > Weather > Allow Notifications, and then select which type of alerts you want.

  • Milica Cosic

    How to prepare for a flood

    • If you’re about to be flooded: Check the National Flood Forum or speak to a Floodline adviser to find out how to stay safe during a flood.
    • You can check if there’s currently a flood warning in your area.
    • Contact your local council to find out where to get sandbags. You can also get them from some DIY or building supplies shops.
    • If you need to travel – Check flood warnings and road travel information.
    • Get advice from the National Flood Forum about how to protect your property and how much this will cost
    • Make a personal flood plan for your home, business or community building
    • Get insurance advice from the National Flood Forum
    • Collect evidence of flood risks – such as completing a Flood Risk Report

    Will we have a White Christmas in the UK?

    November – Colder conditions are expected in the period, with a risk of wintry showers, mainly in the north. Temperatures are likely to be close to or just below average.

    Under high pressure, frost and fog are likely overnight, with any fog slow to clear during the morning, according to the Met Office long-range forecast.

    December – Forecasters predict December will see fog and frost early in the mornings.

    The north will see more changeable weather.

    January – January is typically the coldest month of the year in the UK. Most parts of the UK will see rain while London and parts of the south might see snow, according to forecasters.

    Temperatures are expected to reach between 2C and 7C.

    • Milica Cosic

      Hundreds of passengers hit by delays at Stansted yesterday

      BRITS were facing travel chaos yesterday as Storm Arwen lashed through the country with 100mph winds.

      Trains were cancelled and hundreds of passengers faced long delays at Stansted as blizzards and gales blast in.

      Flight trackers showed ‘excessive’ disruption at Aberdeen International Airport, with a BA flight to Heathrow and an Eastern Airways service to the Shetland Islands cancelled altogether.

      Five flights were heavily delayed.

      There were also long delays at the Isle of Man Airport, Newcastle International Airport, Liverpool John Lennon Airport, and Birmingham International Airport.

      Some furious passengers have hit out after their planes were diverted to London’s Stansted.

    • Milica Cosic

      Drivers, pack these essentials before hitting the roads 

      DRIVERS have been urged to pack their cars with five winter essentials before hitting the road in next week’s expected snowstorms.

      The upcoming chill will no doubt bring with it dangerous road conditions, with slippery black ice increasing the risk of an out-of-control skid and accidents.

      Car insurance provider AA has shared its essential list of cold journey must-haves – if travel in adverse weather is absolutely essential.

      In case of a breakdown, drivers have been told to bring with them a fully-charged phone to call for help.

      A flask of hot drink is another must-have to fend off the cold when stationary – while a torch can be used to help see as daylight hours get shorter.

      Meanwhile, in case an unfortunate skid sends them off the road, a shovel is needed to make sure drivers can free their cars if stuck in snow.

      The insurer also urges drivers to “fully de-ice” their vehicles prior to heading off – including clearing snow from the windows, lights and the roof to help with visibility.

    • Milica Cosic

      Cold weather until Monday

      The Met Office warned that north-east and north-west England, the West Midlands and the East Midlands will experience cold weather until Monday.

      Snow warnings remain in place across large parts of England, including the South East, and Scotland as a cold northerly airflow moves across the country, with up to 5cm expected.

      Mr Petagna said a yellow warning for ice is likely to be issued for northern England and Scotland on Saturday.

    • Milica Cosic

      Weather outlook for Sunday and Monday

      Sunday will be cold but mostly dry and sunny, although there will be more cloud across Scotland and Northern Ireland with a chance of wintry showers.

      Monday will be mostly cloudy with outbreaks of rain spreading into western areas. Rain may fall as sleet and snow for a time across the north-east

    • Milica Cosic

      Pub praised for saving ‘stranded’ travellers from snow & 98mph gales

      A “LOVELY” pub has been praised for saving “stranded” travellers from snow and 98mph gales by offering soup and shelter.

      The Brewers Arms in Berwick-on-Tweed, Northumberland, has set up a fully heated “make-shift shelter” with warm soup for anyone stuck the wind.

      The pub’s landlady Margaret wrote on Facebook: “If anyone is stranded in these winds or their house is unsafe I can go and set up some kind of make-shift shelter in the pub.

      “Please don’t be stuck or in trouble or frightened.”

      She later added: “My mum is now at the pub and anyone is welcome. She’s got the heating on and soup is being heated.”

      Punters flocked to the comments to share their gratitude at the pub’s kind offer.

      Paul Smith wrote: “Thank you to everyone at the Brewers Arms.

      “You are looking after my lovely wife Alyson tonight on her journey from Nairn to Tyneside. Thank you so much.”

    • Milica Cosic

      How do you demist your windscreen?

      Start the heater off cold and then slowly increase the temperature, this will stop the car becoming full of hot “wet” air.

      Make use of the air-con if you have the feature as this will prevent condensation.

      Similarly with a clever climate control system, these features will automatically adjust to achieve the best results.

      If you do not have air-con or climate control leave your windows slightly open to clear the windscreen faster.

      Never drive away until your windscreen is clear.

    • Milica Cosic

      How should you prepare for safe driving in snow?

      Before heading off in the snow, plan your journey carefully and keep up-to-date with local weather reports.

      Also:

      • Allow more time than you usually would and ensure all the snow is clear from your vehicle.
      • It is actually against the law to drive with snow on your car.
      • Carry a lock de-icer with you to clear your locks.
      • Make sure any auto wiper control is switched off before turning the ignition on.
      • If they are frozen to the screen the control fuse will blow.
      • Check your tyres for adequate tread so the grip is sufficient. If conditions are very bad you may want to consider using snow socks or chains.
      • Use a good screenwash that protects down to at least -35C to prevent the water from freezing.

      Being gentler on the throttle and brakes, and slowing down particularly on rural or ungritted routes can help ensure a safe and trouble-free journey, advises the RAC.

      How to solve a car battery problem

      To try and prevent a battery problem from happening in the first place, it can help to charge your battery at least once a week during the winter months, particularly if it is more than three years old.

      A car battery comfort indicator can help monitor its condition. But if your battery isn’t charging well at all, it might be worth getting it replaced when you can.

      You can also do a few small things to help keep your battery in a decent condition:

      1. Switch off all loads including lights, wipers, heater etc before switching off your engine at the end of your journey (and make sure they’re off before you turn the ignition on.) This helps prevent an unnecessary drain on your battery.
      2. Avoid using heaters, heated screens and heated seats for longer than you have to
      3. Park your car in a garage if you’re able to, especially in very cold temperatures
      4. Get your battery properly tested, especially if your car’s over four years old

      Explained: Should I leave my car running to warm it up?

      Avoid doing this if you can. Leaving your car engine going before you start driving doesn’t actually help the engine, but just ramps up your fuel use and emissions.

      Cars older than 20 years do need warming up to get going in the cold weather.

      But most modern engines adjust their temperature accordingly, so car experts say you shouldn’t leave your car running for more than 30 seconds before driving.

      Universal Credit recipients get help in cold weather

      You may be able to get Cold Weather Payments if you claim certain benefits.

      If you’re eligible, you could get £25 if the average temperature in your area is recorded as, or forecast to be, zero degrees celsius or below over seven consecutive days. 

      For this year, the scheme runs between November 1, 2020, and March 31, 2021.

      You’ll get the payments if you’re on Pension Credit, Income Support, income-based Jobseeker’s Allowance, income-related Employment and Support Allowance, Universal Credit or Support for Mortgage Interest.

      You don’t need to apply, as you’ll get paid automatically.

      Keep both eyes on the vehicle

      At the other end of the scale, being lax with the law could see your vehicle nicked.

      Don’t leave it unsupervised while it warms up, Tony advises.

      He said: “Don’t start the car to defrost it and go back indoors, you leave it vulnerable to being stolen.”

      We’ve reported on all the checks you need to do before you set off this winter.

      And the risk taken by too many Brit drivers with poor tyres.

      You must also make sure you’re entirely sober behind the wheel, especially as Christmas party season hits.

      Though it’s impossible to know exactly how much alcohol you can handle before driving, it’s better to have none for the road.

      What is the coldest place on Earth?

      By a long way, the coldest place on Earth is Vostok, Antarctica, where the lowest ever temperature was recorded.

      A Russian research station in Vostok once clocked lows of -89.2C and is so close to the poles that it gets mere minutes of sunshine a day in winter.

      During the cold months, the average temperature in Vostok is around -68C, while the summer average is a tooth-chattering -32C.

      But, apart from researchers at the Russian station, nobody ever ventures to Vostok… for obvious reasons.

      This means that the title of coldest inhabited place on Earth goes to Oymyakon, a rural town in Eastern Russia which is home to fewer than 900 people.

      Throughout the winter, the ground is permanently frozen, with a low of −67.7 degrees C recorded on February 6, 1933.

      • Milica Cosic

        Winter driving laws you need to know

        FROSTY conditions bring tougher roads – and the possibility of huge fines for drivers.

        We reveal which rules are easiest to break at this time of year and how to make sure you steer clear of any trouble.

        • Clean your windscreen or face a fine – or worse
        • Wear proper footwear
        • Check your tyres
        • Clear the roof

        Read the article in full here.

        Those living on the coast need to take extra care

        Brits who live on the coast and are being urged to take special care – as they could be hit with waves as high as 10 metres.

        Grahame Madge, a Met Office spokesman, said the forecaster didn’t “issue red warnings lightly” and warned people to stay away from the affected area.

        He said: “In addition to this one, I would emphasise the risk for coastal communities.

        “We are talking about wave heights that really are exceptional. I’ve heard sort of nine-10 metre waves out to sea, which is you know, is particularly noteworthy.

        “We’re looking at the vulnerability of people like coastal anglers, for example, shore fishermen, people visiting in order to get photos, all of these communities need to take particular care and assess the risk.

        “And obviously, don’t go if they feel that there’s any risk to themselves or others by them being there.”

        What do you do if you hit black ice?

        • Stay calm
        • Do as little as possible and allow the car to pass over the ice
        • Don’t brake
        • Try and keep the steering wheel straight
        • If your back wheels start to slide left or right very slightly turn the wheel the same way
        • If you turn in the opposite directing you risk skidding and spinning off the road
        • Slow down by taking your foot off the accelerator

        Will we have a White Christmas in the UK?

        November – Colder conditions are expected in the period, with a risk of wintry showers, mainly in the north. Temperatures are likely to be close to or just below average.

        Under high pressure, frost and fog are likely overnight, with any fog slow to clear during the morning, according to the Met Office long-range forecast.

        December – Forecasters predict December will see fog and frost early in the mornings.

        The north will see more changeable weather.

        January – January is typically the coldest month of the year in the UK. Most parts of the UK will see rain while London and parts of the south might see snow, according to forecasters.

        Temperatures are expected to reach between 2C and 7C.

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