Prince Harry and William 'unite' to approve Princess Diana statue

Harry and William approve design of Princess Diana statue that they are both due to unveil in July – as Zara Tindall ‘plays peacemaker’ after Oprah interview left Duke of Cambridge ‘furious’

  • Harry and William said to have signed off final design for commissioned statue
  • Planners at Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea earlier approved plans 
  • Statue set to be revealed on July 1 – what would have been Diana’s 60th birthday
  • Hope of repairing brothers’ rift comes in aftermath of explosive Oprah interview

Prince Harry and William have reportedly reunited to approve the statue of Princess Diana in time for an unveiling at Kensington Palace in the summer.

The brothers are said to have signed off on a final design for the statue set to be revealed on July 1 – what would have been their late mother’s 60th birthday.

Sculptor Ian Rank-Broadley, whose portrait of the Queen appears on all British coins, is creating the commissioned statue.

The hope of repairing a rift between the pair comes in the aftermath of Harry and Meghan Markle’s explosive two-hour CBS interview with Oprah Winfrey last month.

A source claimed to The Sun that Zara Tindall and her husband Mike had been playing peacemaker between the two for months before the Oprah interview. 

And a source close to the sculptor told The Sun: ‘It will have been signed off by William and Harry, that much I do know.’  


Prince William (pictured left) and Harry (right, in LA) are said to have signed off on a final design for the statue set to be revealed on July 1 – what would have been Diana’s 60th birthday

The statue was commissioned to mark the twentieth anniversary of Princess Diana’s death and recognise her positive impact around the world

Princess Diana pictured with her sons, William and Harry, in Toronto during their visit to Canada (file photo)

The hope of repairing a rift between the pair comes in the aftermath of Harry and Meghan Markle’s explosive two-hour CBS interview with Oprah Winfrey last month

Who is Ian Rank-Broadley? 

Ian Rank-Broadley is an acclaimed British sculptor, who has worked on several designs for British money.

The 69-year-old, who lives and works in Gloucestershire, was first commissioned by the Royal Mint in 1997 to design a new effigy of the Queen for British coins.

Ian Rank-Broadley is an acclaimed British sculptor, who has worked on several designs for British money.

He also won the commission for a centennial crown of the Queen Mother in 2000 and designed the 2007 coin to celebrate the 60th wedding anniversary of the Queen and Prince Philip.

Alongside his work on coins, he has a number of permanent collections in top museums, including the British Museum, London’s National Portrait Gallery and the Fitzwilliam Museum Cambridge.

In 2010 he completed a memorial to Dean Colet, founder of St Paul’s School, London, which can be seen in St Paul’s Cathedral.

Prince William is said to be furious at Harry and Meghan’s tell-all to Oprah, after the pair levelled accusations of racism at the Royal family.

They claimed one member – who they did not name – had asked what colour Archie’s skin would be when Meghan was pregnant.

The interview came after the Duke of Cambridge was angered by the way the Sussexes ‘insulted’ the Queen with a ‘disrespectful’ response to her ban on them using the word ‘royal’ in future business ventures when they announced they were leaving royal life. 

‘I know he did work closely with the boys and I think it will be incredible. We’re lucky to have him as an artist in the UK.’ 

Planners at the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea previously approved plans for the statue despite only being given its dimensions and location.

Historic England also said the proposal would not have an adverse effect on the Grade I-listed Kensington Palace. 

Jane Siddell, inspector of Ancient Monuments for Historic England, earlier wrote: ‘The proposed art installation is located within the Sunken Garden, an early 20th century element of the gardens located a little way from the east front of the Palace.

‘The location has been carefully chosen, with the statue to be located off-centre on one of the paths within the garden, close to an opening in the hedges.

‘It will be visible to the public viewing the garden, but the statue will not impinge upon views of, or from the Palace owing to its slightly sunken and screened position. 

‘There is a tradition of statues being installed in Kensington Gardens and around Kensington Palace, for instance the statue of King William III to the south of the palace, and Queen Victoria by the Round Pond, and the proposed installation follows that tradition.’ 

Historic England previously said the proposal would not have an adverse effect on the Grade I-listed Kensington Palace (file photo of palace and gardens)

The brothers’ reunion will come after Prince Harry made reference to the rift with William during his interview with Oprah (pictured: Harry and William in Windsor in 2018)

Princess Diana with her sons on a sleigh ride during their skiing holiday in Lech, Austria

A source claimed that Zara Tindall and her husband Mike had been playing peacemaker between the two for months before the Oprah interview

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle told royal advisors ‘you can’t stop us doing what we want’ 

Harry and Meghan told palace bosses ‘you can’t stop us from doing what we want’ in clashes before leaving the Royal family, it has been claimed.

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex ‘called the shots’ and specifically instructed press officers on what information they felt should be made public, according to reports.

The claims come despite Harry telling Oprah in the couple’s bombshell interview that no plans were made before Megxit was announced last January.

It also emerged last night that the pair were in talks with a £1.3billion-backed US company a year before they stepped down as senior royals.

Harry, 36, and Meghan, 39, are said to have had multiple meetings with Quibi, a now-defunct video streaming service, from early 2019 until after they quit as working royals last January.

Prince Harry returned from the landmark Sandringham summit to meet executives from the American company in London, according to the Daily Telegraph.

A deal for him to provide content on the platform reportedly reached advanced stages but ultimately fell through as the app failed to take off, according to the paper.

Vanity Fair also claimed the couple had been approached by Quibi founder, Jeffrey Katzenberg and its CEO Meg Whitman.

Despite this, during the Sussexes’ bombshell interview with Oprah Winfrey they claimed they ‘didn’t have a plan’ when leaving the Royal family.

Prince Harry had made reference to his relation with William during his interview with Oprah amid reports the brothers had fallen out in the wake of Brexit.

He told the talk show host: ‘As I’ve said before, I love William to bits. He’s my brother. 

‘We’ve been through hell together. 

‘I mean, we have a shared experience. But we’re on different paths.’ 

William insisted the royals were ‘very much not a racist family’ as he and Kate visited a school in east London to support a youth mental health support service in March.

Sky News reporter Inzamam Rashid asked him: ‘Sir, have you spoken to your brother since the interview?’ 

Prince William replied tersely: ‘I haven’t spoken to him yet, but I will do.’ 

Ian Rank-Broadley declined to comment and MailOnline has reached out to Buckingham Palace. 

The Queen and Prince Charles were all smiles as they were pictured together for the first time on Friday after the interview – while Prince Harry relaxed on a beach in California over 5,000 miles away. 

The charming new image of the Queen and Prince Charles enjoying a socially-distanced walk was snapped as they took part in a private engagement at Frogmore on the monarch’s Windsor estate, details of which will be released in the next few weeks.

While the latest picture was captured on a whim, it serves to provide a happy contrast to events of recent months. 

Meanwhile, Prince Charles recorded a verse by acclaimed poet and Catholic priest Gerard Manley Hopkins to show support for Christians at Easter.

The Prince of Wales, 72, has narrated the Hopkins poem God’s Grandeur which will be played during a virtual service on Sunday morning at Stonyhurst College, a Catholic boarding school in Lancashire where the Victorian cleric taught.

Sitting in front a grand bookcase, the royal, who was yesterday pictured having a socially distanced walk with his 94-year-old mother in Windsor, sported his signature look of a navy suit, white shirt, patterned tie and pocket square.

‘The Prince of Wales has recorded the Gerard Manley Hopkins Poem, God’s Grandeur, to show support for Christians around the world at Easter. 

The Queen, who turns 95 later this month, looked radiant. Wearing one of her famed headscarves with a green, full-length raincoat and black rubber boots, she smiled and laughed, with her gloved hands in her pockets

Queen Elizabeth and Prince Charles enjoy spring weather and pose for a portrait in the garden of Frogmore House in Windsor

The world is charged with the grandeur of God.

It will flame out, like shining from shook foil;

It gathers to a greatness, like the ooze of oil

Crushed. Why do men then now not reck his rod?

Generations have trod, have trod, have trod;

And all is seared with trade; bleared, smeared with toil;

And wears man’s smudge and shares man’s smell: the soil

Is bare now, nor can foot feel, being shod.

And for all this, nature is never spent;

There lives the dearest freshness deep down things;

And though the last lights off the black West went

Oh, morning, at the brown brink eastward, springs —

Because the Holy Ghost over the bent

World broods with warm breast and with ah! bright wings.

 

‘Easter is the most important festival of the Christian Church, celebrating the resurrection of Jesus Christ on the third day after his crucifixion, and Hopkins’s poem captures the hope and joy associated with that season,’ Clarence House said in a statement. 

The poem begins with the lines: ‘The world is charged with the grandeur of God.

‘It will flame out, like shining from shook foil; It gathers to a greatness, like the ooze of oil Crushed.’ 

Hopkins was one of the most influential poets of the Victorian era who converted to Catholicism but gave up writing poetry after deciding to train to become a priest.

Some years later he took up his pen again when inspired to write a long poem in memory of five nuns who died in a shipwreck.

His poems were not published in full until 1918, almost 30 years after his death, and Hopkins’ use of language, new rhythmic effects and unusual word combinations were a huge influence on major literary figures like WH Auden and Dylan Thomas.

Both the Queen and Charles have been deeply saddened by the acrimonious departure of Harry and Meghan as working royals and their subsequent emigration to California.

And as a doting grandmother and father they were also personally wounded by the bitter and highly damaging allegations that have since been thrown at them – and other Royal Family members – by the couple. 

It comes as Prince Harry was spotted on a seaside stroll with his dog as he settles into the LA lifestyle after landing two jobs including a role as a Silicon Valley ‘chief impact officer’.

A relaxed Duke of Sussex, 36, wore his baseball cap backwards and sported a pair of sunglasses while frolicking in the sea and throwing a tennis ball for his black Labrador, Pula on Friday. 

Meghan Markle coffee firm bought oat milk from company based in China’s ‘police state’ Xinjiang province where a million Muslim Uighur people are kept in camps and brutally persecuted 

By Mark Hookham for the Mail on Sunday 

A trendy coffee company financially backed by the Duchess of Sussex has imported tons of a key ingredient from a Chinese supplier based in a brutal police state where an alleged genocide is taking place.

Human rights groups have urged Western companies to cut all business ties with China’s Xinjiang region because of appalling abuses, including the widespread use of forced labour and the detention of a million Uighur Muslims in re-education camps, where it is claimed women are systematically raped.

But The Mail on Sunday can reveal that Clevr Blends, which Meghan last year proudly announced she was investing in as she praised its ethically sourced ingredients, has received almost 19 tons of oat milk powder from a company based in Urumqi, the capital of Xinjiang.

Hours before the Duchess’s investment was announced, Oprah Winfrey enthusiastically plugged the company on social media to her millions of followers after receiving a basket of their products from a neighbour, ‘M’.

The Duchess of Sussex last year proudly announced she was investing in Clevr Blends as she praised its ethically sourced ingredients

The supplier – Xinjiang Haiyan International Trade – has its head office within four miles of four suspected detention centres, including a possible maximum security prison, and an alleged re-education site.

Fashion giants H&M, Burberry and Marks & Spencer have refused to source cotton from Xinjiang because of concerns over forced labour. 

And last year at least five organisations said they would no longer help companies audit their supply chains in Xinjiang because workers are unable to speak out without fear of reprisals.

There is no evidence to suggest that Xinjiang Haiyan has used forced labour and The Mail on Sunday understands that the oats were neither grown nor processed in Xinjiang. 

When contacted by an undercover reporter, a representative said that the oats are farmed and turned into milk powder in different Chinese provinces, many miles from the Uighur region.

The MoS was told that Clevr Blends stopped working with Xinjiang Haiyan several months ago and now uses a US supplier, which uses Canadian oats. 

It’s understood that Meghan had not been aware of Clevr’s previous relationship with Xinjiang Haiyan.

Publicly available shipping records seen by this newspaper reveal that Clevr received its first of five deliveries of oat milk powder from Xinjiang Haiyan on October 6. 

Human rights groups have urged Western companies to cut all business ties with China ‘s Xinjiang region because of appalling abuses, including the widespread use of forced labour and the detention of a million Uighur Muslims in re-education camps, where it is claimed women are systematically raped

And its most recent delivery – totalling 8.8 tons – arrived on February 28, according to the US import records provided by data firms Panjiva and Import Genius.

Campaigners last night warned against dealing with Xinjiang-based firms because of the difficulties in confirming that they are not benefiting, if not directly then indirectly, from human rights abuses.

Chloe Cranston of Anti-Slavery International said: ‘It’s virtually impossible to be sure that any workplace in the Uighur region is free from forced labour, so no responsible business should wish to trade with any organisation based there. The situation is a human rights crisis at a level that we haven’t seen since the Second World War and the situation is that companies have to choose whether they want to be on the right side of history or not.

‘Any investor – regardless of who they are – should hold their portfolio companies accountable on their ties to the Uighur region.’

Iain Duncan Smith, the former Tory leader whom Beijing last month slapped sanctions on for speaking out against human rights abuses, said: ‘Because Xinjiang is heavily involved in what I call genocide and slave labour, then any business done with that region runs the risk of that being involved with slave labour. So any company that is doing business there shouldn’t do business in Xinjiang.’

Campaigners have warned against dealing with firms based in Xinjiang (pictured)  because of the difficulties in confirming that they are not benefiting, if not directly then indirectly, from human rights abuses

Founded by entrepreneurs Hannah Mendoza and Roger Coppola in Santa Barbara, California, in 2019, Clevr Blends sells instant oat-milk lattes, costing £20 for a packet with 14 servings. 

Its website states that ‘ethics are always at the forefront of our product’, adding: ‘We prioritise working with smaller, family run ingredient suppliers or those with more transparent supply chains.’

In December, the Duchess of Sussex announced she was investing in the brand, telling Fortune magazine: ‘I’m proud to invest in Hannah’s commitment to sourcing ethical ingredients and creating a product that I personally love and [that] has a holistic approach to wellness.’

Clevr’s former supplier Xinjiang Haiyan is based in a business complex in Urumqi. The Australian Strategic Policy Institute has pinpointed more than 20 suspected detention centres in the city, including four only a short drive from Xinjiang Haiyan’s office on Pudong Street in the city’s Xinshi district.

The company’s website says all its products come ‘from certified factories’, although it does not detail where any of the more than 300 factories and distributors it says it uses are located. 

The website also says it has a ‘traceability’ system so customers can pinpoint where products and raw materials come from.

However, a prominent picture on the website of a whitewashed industrial building is a stock image used by a string of other Chinese companies, including a uPVC window and door supplier, a manufacturer of massage chairs and a truck manufacturer. 

Xinjiang Haiyan’s company logo appears to have been digitally placed on to the photo to make it appear as if it is emblazoned across the top of the building.

An undercover MoS reporter contacted the company and was told by sales director Catherine Zhang that it could supply 344 tons of oat milk powder a month and that it boasts clients in the US, Australia and New Zealand.

Oprah Winfrey also plugged the company on social media to her millions of followers after receiving a basket of their products from a neighbour

The company’s website, the shipping records for Clevr Blends and an invoice for an order of oat milk powder all state the company is based in Urumqi. 

The company sells the product on Alibaba, the Chinese version of Amazon, where its ‘place of origin’ is given as Xinjiang.

But quizzed by the undercover MoS reporter, posing as a potential customer, Ms Zhang said the oats were grown in Inner Mongolia, a different Chinese province, and processed into milk powder in the central Chinese city of Xi’an.

In January, the US accused China of committing genocide and crimes against humanity in Xinjiang. Proposed legislation being debated in the US Congress would ban imports from the region, unless it is certified they are not produced with forced labour – something experts believe will be impossible to do.

Penelope Kyritsis, of the Workers Rights Consortium, a Washington DC-based watchdog, warned that dealing with a firm based in Urumqi was a ‘huge red flag’. ‘We take the position that no company should be conducting any business in the Uighur region,’ she said.

Representatives for Meghan did not respond to a request for comment. But sources close to the Duchess of Sussex said she would never work with any organisation that does not uphold the highest ethical standards and human rights protections.

When contacted by this newspaper last week, a representative for Clevr Blends said: ‘I personally have no awareness of this issue, and feel convinced that Clevr would never intentionally hire companies with such practices. Thank you for bringing this to our awareness.’

Xinjiang Haiyan did not respond to a request to comment.

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