Families face paying £600 for tests to go on foreign holidays

Families face paying £600 for tests to go on foreign holidays: Traffic light system will require at least £150 per person extra – even if the destination is on the ‘green list’

  • Under traffic light system each traveller will take at least two tests on holidays 
  • The first is taken 72 hours before boarding a flight home, the next two days later
  • The pre-departure tests could add hundreds of pounds to families going abroad 

Families face having to fork out hundreds of pounds for Covid tests to go on foreign holidays this summer – even if travel bans on some countries are lifted, it has emerged.

Under the Government’s traffic light system, each traveller will still have to take at least two tests on holidays to low-risk ‘green’ destinations, potentially costing at least £600 per family.

One would be taken 72 hours before boarding a UK-bound flight with another two days after arrival.

The traffic light system could add hundreds of pounds to the cost of family holidays abroad

The latter would be for detecting whether travellers have picked up any mutant strains while abroad.

Studies submitted to ministers considering how to unlock foreign travel show two-test systems are more effective at controlling the spread of infection.

But arranging pre-departure tests abroad could prove a logistical nightmare and alone add at least £400 to the cost of a holiday abroad for a family of four.

The second post-arrival test could put on a further £200.

Destinations are also likely to retain demands for a pre-holiday test to be shown at the border for people not fully vaccinated, potentially adding hundreds more pounds to the cost of a getaway.

Although ten-day post-arrival quarantine would be dropped for holidaymakers arriving from ‘green’ destinations, many families will be put off by the additional costs and hassle of arranging the tests.

It is understood the pre-departure test before boarding a UK-bound flight may even apply to fully vaccinated people.

Croatia yesterday became the latest country to announce Britons would be welcome this summer.

But unvaccinated visitors will have to show a pre-holiday test taken within 48 hours upon entry.

Holidaymakers staying for two weeks would be required to take a second test by the tenth day.

It means unvaccinated tourists on longer stays would face having to take four tests in total even if the country makes it on to the Government’s green list.

The pre-departure test before boarding a UK-bound flight could even apply to fully vaccinated travellers

Boris Johnson is set to confirm plans for a staged lifting of the ban on foreign holidays on Monday, with a further announcement in the following weeks explaining how the scheme will work.

He will set out the rough framework of the traffic light system.

The PM will say it is too early to set a date for when it will come into operation, but Whitehall sources said he will not completely rule out the possibility some travel could resume on May 17.

A Government source said: ‘It is still too early. At the moment, we have vaccinated half of the adult population but we still don’t know how strong our wall of defence is until we see more of the data.

‘We are not going to do anything that threatens the roadmap and will take a cautious approach until we better understand the impact of the vaccines.’ 

Only destinations with high vaccination rates, low prevalence of mutant variants with good capabilities for detecting them and low infection rates are likely to make it on to the green list. 

By May 17, only a handful of countries – if any – are likely to be designated green.

The US, Maldives and Malta are among the contenders due to their higher vaccination rates. All three have rates of about 45 per 100 people. By comparison the UK’s vaccination rate is 53 per 100 people.

Other possible destinations are Gibraltar, Israel, the Seychelles and the United Arab Emirates.

Boris Johnson is set to confirm plans for a staged lifting of the ban on foreign holidays on Monday, with more information coming in the next few weeks

Some Caribbean destinations could also become contenders if their vaccination drives continue at pace.

But quarantine-free holidays to traditionally popular destinations such as Greece, Italy and Spain may be some way off amid the EU’s sluggish vaccine rollout.

The countries’ vaccination rates are all around 17 per 100 people. Most of the Continent is likely to be ‘amber’ until July or August.

It came as travel industry leaders warned failure to reopen for the summer would put more than a million jobs at risk and could stall the post-pandemic recovery.

Tim Alderslade, chief executive of Airlines UK, said: ‘We have to start somewhere – for the sake of jobs, the billions our sector provides the Treasury and any realistic concept of a Global Britain future.’

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