A&E nurse, 43, catches Covid after his second vaccination postponed

A&E nurse, 43, catches Covid after his second vaccination was postponed when Government changed jab rules

  • David Longden, 43, was given the first Pfizer jab because he worked on frontline
  • His second injection was due to take place on January 5 but was scrapped
  • The guidance changed to try to increase number of people getting first dose
  • Mr Longden said NHS staff were not being adequately protected from the virus 

An A&E nurse has tested positive for coronavirus after his second vaccination jab was posted when the Government changed the rules.

David Longden, 43, was given the first Pfizer jab because he worked on the frontline at the Princess of Wales hospital in Bridgend, South Wales.

His second injection was due to take place on January 5 but was scrapped when the guidance changed to try to get as many as people vaccinated with their first jab’s as possible. 

He is now having to self-isolate after testing positive. Mr Longden was one of the first to get his first dose of the Pfizer jab on the day it was first rolled out in Wales on December 8.

David Longden (pictured), 43, was given the first Pfizer jab because he worked on the frontline at the Princess of Wales hospital in Bridgend, South Wales

But he tested positive on January 8 – three days after he was due to have his second shot.

He said: ‘The Government needs to protect their frontline NHS staff – to not do so is just short-sighted.

‘I’ve now been taken out of action for several days while the emergency department is slammed with patients. Bridgend is one of the areas of Wales with the highest rates of coronavirus.

‘I’m also running the risk of exposing my partner to the virus. He’s diabetic and has lots of other health issues. So to be given that second dose would have given me peace of mind as well as him.’

Mr Longden is now self-isolating away from partner Andrew Price in a log cabin in the garden of his home in Pontypridd.

His first symptoms were a head cold – but a day later he tested positive for coronavirus. ‘I had a headache and then a horrendous head cold,’ he said. 

His second injection was due to take place on January 5 but was scrapped when the guidance changed to try to get as many as people vaccinated with their first jab’s as possible. Pictured, Princess of Wales hospital

‘The day before that I also had a bout of diarrhoea and then just felt really “fluey” and lethargic. I became increasingly unwell and had many of the typical Covid symptoms like loss of taste and smell, but thankfully I haven’t had a temperature yet.

‘In the first wave I never tested positive with Covid, and I’m very vigilant with my hand washing as I’ve tried to protect my partner as much as I can.

‘But with this new strain they say it’s 50 per cent more virulent and I think that’s clearly the case.’

The Welsh NHS has a record number of staff absences at the moment due to positive cases and self-isolating.

He tested positive on January 8 – three days after he was due to have his second shot


Mr Longden is now self-isolating away from partner Andrew Price in a log cabin in the garden of his home in Pontypridd

He added: ‘In the first wave, frontline staff were not always protected from the virus due to a lack of PPE.

‘Now I feel the general consensus among staff is that, despite the fact we have a vaccine offering 95 per cent immunity, we are again not being protected fully. It’s a double whammy.’

He said the Covid area of A&E at his hospital is frequently full. ‘It’s hard-going and the workload is relentless. Luckily in Bridgend we’ve got a fantastic team and we all pull together.

‘I feel proud and privileged to be working alongside them.’

Welsh Health Minister Vaughan Gething said the decision to extend the gap between the two doses of the Pfizer vaccine would avoid more deaths.

He said: ‘Think of it in this way: if you have two doses of the vaccine available you could choose to give that to one person to provide them with full excellent protection, or you could decide to give two doses to two different people to provide both of them with high level protection.’

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